The Peace Process

Ever since Britain issued its Balfour Declaration in 1917, the Zionist Jews and
the Arabs have been engaged in a “peace process”, usually accompanied by
violence of one sort or another by either or both parties to the fate of Palestine.

Finally, in the late 1980’s, the Palestine Liberation Organization recognized
Israel, followed by the Oslo Accords of 1993, a so-called interim peace
agreement.

Thirteen years later, these moribund peace talks have led nowhere insofar as a
comprehensive peace agreement is concerned.

The Palestinians are looking for a “peace with justice”; the Israelis are looking
for a sign-off on the status quo—no
‘right of return” for the 3,900,000 Palestinian refugees; no return of their
property and lands.

To the Palestinians, their “right of return” is non-negotiable; to the Israelis, this
will never be allowed.

This “right of return” is re-affirmed by  the United Nations General Assembly
every year by a vote of 170 to 3, as well as the right of the Palestinians to their
property and lands in Israel.

Not surprising, the 3 are Israel, the United States and Togo, a United States
protectorate.

To complicate the balance in favor of Israel, the United States vetoes all
attempts by the United Nations Security Council to enforce its findings; the
United States Congress gives Israel 3 billion dollars a year in military and
economic aid; the United States Congress gives Egypt 2 billion dollars in
economic aid yearly for having signed a peace agreement with Israel; the United
States Congress gives Jordan 650 million dollars in economic aid yearly for
having signed a peace agreement with Israel; and the world gives UNRWA, the
United Nations relief agency sustaining 3.9 million Palestinian refugees from the
1948, 1967 wars, etc., 408 million dollars, or $104 per person.

By contrast, the United States Congress gives each Israeli $400.

June 30, 2004

The Peace Process

Ever since Britain issued its Balfour Declaration in 1917, the Zionist Jews and
the Arabs have been engaged in a “peace process”, usually accompanied by
violence of one sort or another by either or both parties to the fate of Palestine.

Finally, in the late 1980’s, the Palestine Liberation Organization recognized
Israel, followed by the Oslo Accords of 1993, a so-called interim peace
agreement.

Thirteen years later, these moribund peace talks have led nowhere insofar as a
comprehensive peace agreement is concerned.

The Palestinians are looking for a “peace with justice”; the Israelis are looking
for a sign-off on the status quo—no
‘right of return” for the 3,900,000 Palestinian refugees; no return of their
property and lands.

To the Palestinians, their “right of return” is non-negotiable; to the Israelis, this
will never be allowed.

This “right of return” is re-affirmed by  the United Nations General Assembly
every year by a vote of 170 to 3, as well as the right of the Palestinians to their
property and lands in Israel.

Not surprising, the 3 are Israel, the United States and Togo, a United States
protectorate.

To complicate the balance in favor of Israel, the United States vetoes all
attempts by the United Nations Security Council to enforce its findings; the
United States Congress gives Israel 3 billion dollars a year in military and
economic aid; the United States Congress gives Egypt 2 billion dollars in
economic aid yearly for having signed a peace agreement with Israel; the United
States Congress gives Jordan 650 million dollars in economic aid yearly for
having signed a peace agreement with Israel; and the world gives UNRWA, the
United Nations relief agency sustaining 3.9 million Palestinian refugees from the
1948, 1967 wars, etc., 408 million dollars, or $104 per person.

By contrast, the United States Congress gives each Israeli $400.

June 30, 2004

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